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Tag Archives: neonatology

Outlet in The Hypoxia Challenge Test Does Not Accurately Predict Hypoxia in Flight in Ex-Preterm Neonates

Posted on March 26, 2016

neonatal chronic lung diseaseForty-six consecutive eligible infants were recruited between December 2005 and October 2006. No parents refused enrollment, and no infants were excluded from the study. The median gestation was 32.2 weeks (range, 24 to 35.6 weeks), with a median birth weight of 1,667 g (range, 655 to 2,815 g). Twenty-seven infants (59%) had NLD, and neonatal chronic lung disease subsequently developed in 2 infants.

All infants had Sp02 in room air > 95% prior to the HCT. The HCT was performed at a median corrected age of 35.8 weeks (range, 33.1 to 43 weeks), and the median time from HCT to flight was 2 days (range, 1 to 15 days). Delays in transferring infants after the HCT related to poor staffing at the receiving hospital. Median flight distance and duration was 593 km (range, 417 to 2,174 km) and 62.5 min (range, 45 to 150 min), respectively. Thirty-five infants (76%) passed the HCT, while 11 infants (24%) failed the HCT. During the flight, 16 infants (35%) met the criteria for in-flight oxygen; 12 of these infants (75%) had passed the HCT. Table 1 details the demographics and respiratory diagnoses of those requiring oxygen in flight. Of the 11 infants who failed the HCT, only 4 infants (36%) met the criteria for in-flight oxygen. The overall accuracy of the HCT was 59%. Sensitivity and specificity of the HCT for predicting in-flight hypoxia were 25% and 76.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the test were 36% and 65.7%, respectively.

Investigation about The Hypoxia Challenge Test Does Not Accurately Predict Hypoxia in Flight in Ex-Preterm Neonates

Posted on March 26, 2016

neonatal lung disease

Subjects

All infants born at < 35 completed weeks gestation and cared for in the Neonatal Unit at King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women, who were to fly to a regional hospital, were considered for inclusion in the study. Infants with and without a history of neonatal lung disease (NLD) were recruited. We excluded infants with Down syndrome and infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease. Written informed consent was obtained from guardians. The study was approved by the ethics committee at King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women (Ethics Committee No. EC05-49.1). We defined NLD as respiratory distress requiring oxygen or respiratory support or both at any time, and neonatal chronic lung disease as the need for supplemental oxygen at 28 days of life, or at 36 weeks after menstrual age.